Last Book You Read/How Was It

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Last Book You Read/How Was It

Postby Alice » Wed Oct 06, 2010 1:53 pm

Surprised we don't already have a thread for this.

Read a few this past month.

Re-read some Conan stuff. Hawks Over Shem, Black Colossus, Shadows in the Moonlight, The Road of the Eagles, and A Witch Shall Be Born. Conan is always good unless it's not the original Bobby Howard stories. Pop-culture, pastiche Conan can die, thank you.

Then I went on a Stephen King kick for some reason.

Duma Key: Good. Especially the painting bit, which I really liked. But then, in standard King fashion, it starts to get weak towards the end. Ghost zombies and a weak last few chapters. There's some genuinely creepy bits, and overall I enjoyed it barring a few things that made me eye roll.

Rage: Written by King when he was in college, and subsequently banned after several people that decided to shoot up their school were found to have the book in their possession. Obviously banned because it was a story about a kid taking his high school class hostage and killing a few people, and I can honestly see how some dumbass high school kid could read it and go, "That's awesome. If I mimic this I'll be cool." All said, the story is passable, and very juvenile.

The Long Walk: Alternate future where, annually, one-hundred teenagers compete in a marathon where they have to walk a steady four miles an hour non-stop until only one is left standing. The winner is set for life. The rules: If your speed drops below four miles per hour (Slight spoilers, as the rules are very vague in the beginning and you gradually get more info as the story advances) you get a warning from the soldiers riding along side the walkers. You get three warnings. When your warnings are extinguished, if you drop below four miles per hour you're executed. I loved this one. Slow to start, but picks up speed after the first couple of chapters.

Road Work: When the city plans to build a new freeway it's set to be built directly through a residential area. The story follows one man's journey from stable minded working man to unhinged rebel, as he tries to stop the city from taking his home. Very reminiscent of Falling Down, as you can kinda feel sorry for the protagonist/anti-hero. Liked it quite a bit, but it's a very slow book. Not a lot of action going on. It's more about the character than the action.

The Running Man: Yeah. The one with Arnold. Except it's almost nothing like the movie aside from there's a game show. Ben Richards is a middle class working man that's out of a job, and his infant daughter is sick. To remedy his money problems to pay for medical help he goes to the government run Free-Vee broadcasters (The shady government exploitation angle was hinted at in the movie, but in the book it's a major chunk of the story) and is chosen to be on The Running Man. Where, unlike the movie, you have a runner that's hunted down by one bounty hunter and his underlings. The runner is free to go anywhere he wants, at any time he wants. The only catch is he has to record and send in two videos of himself every day to the studio or he will forfeit the game. He has a twelve hour head start on the hunters, and for every hour he's alive he wins $1,000. If he manages to evade the hunters for a whole month he wins a grand prize of one billion. Any civilians that spot him can also call in to the studio and receive $100 for any leads. Like I said earlier, the movie and book are almost completely different aside from the obvious "Guy on reality game show hunted by killers" plot. For that reason I can't really say, "The book is better than the movie" here, because they're both so different it would almost be like apples and oranges. They both bring interesting stuff to the table.

Currently reading:

Skeleton Crew: Started reading this, and I got about halfway through "The Mist" before I went to the book store and remembered some old Doom novels I always wanted from the early 90s.

Couldn't find the original four, but I did find some based on the new "remake" Doom 3. The guy they hired to write the script for the game apparently decided to write some accompanying novels as well. I'm half way through "Worlds On Fire" and there have been no monsters from Hell yet. Feels like the book is more backstory building up to the game story. In the beginning it alternates chapters between the Mars UAC facility and Earth. The Mars chapters are of a UAC CEO checking up on the projects underway, and the Earth portions are of the Doomguy, John Kane, and the events that lead to him being court martialed and re-assigned to UAC security on Mars. So far, it's pretty decent sci-fi, and it's interesting enough to make me hurry through, because I want to know if the next book "Maelstrom" chronicles the game's events or if it's something new, since it doesn't appear the game's events will have room to be touched upon in this book.
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Postby exolstice » Wed Oct 06, 2010 2:52 pm

Last two books:

Rebel without a Crew - Robert Rodriguez tells how he made his first film with no crew for $7,000 (mostly financed by medical experimentation). It's written like a diary (which I believe it was) and charts the whole process from original idea to world-wide acclaim. Pretty cool, and invaluable reading for anyone even remotely interested in making a movie.

Writing Movies - I've been enlightening (or boring, or annoying) Laura almost daily with stuff I learned from that book. It gets very technical, but still reads like a novel. I just picked it at random from the shelf, and I'm very glad I did. Includes 5 case studies using actual screenplays (Die Hard, Sideways, Tootsie, Shawshank Redemption, Thelma & Louise) and those scripts are used in every chapter to illustrate various aspects of writing. Each chapter is written by a different, professional screenwriter. Anyway, thumbs up.
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Postby Alice » Thu Oct 07, 2010 11:47 am

Just found out the Doom 3 series was supposed to be three volumes, but the third book was canceled for whatever reason. That's two series that I enjoyed canceled right before the final book. At least with this series I'll have a rough idea of how it's supposed to end.
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Postby Alice » Sat Apr 09, 2011 2:47 am

Finished the Doom 3 books a while ago. The last book left off in a way were there could be another book, but it wasn't necessary. Like a story arc stop with an open end. I enjoyed it.

Recently decided to read the whole Amazing Spider-Man series from #1 to current (late 600s). I'm up to #11. It's hard to read old comics after getting used to modern stuff. There's so much exposition on every panel, and characters describing what they're doing even when the art makes it obvious (e.g. "Oh no. I've fallen and in mere seconds I will hit the ground. How will I take care of Aunt May if I become incapacitated? My only chance for survival is if I use my web-shooters to latch on to the Vulture's foot and pull myself back up. I sure hope I don't miss. Gotcha! Whew! Crisis averted for now, but now I have to take out the Vulture before he flies away with those bags of money he stole from the exchange." <-- That all gets crammed into about three word/thought bubbles.)
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Postby Ghost » Sat Apr 09, 2011 9:18 am

Yeah, I can't deal with that most of the time. It does make for some hilarious unintentional comedy. Stuff like, "But he can never know that I, Bruce Wayne, am really the Batman."

WHY WOULD YOU THINK THAT
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Postby Alice » Sat May 21, 2011 12:13 am

The Stand: The Complete & Uncut Edition: It's been a while since I read the original, so I can barely tell which stuff was in the original and what was added even though there were some 300+ pages added. I still love it though. Still got about a third or so to go.

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Ghostbusters: The Return: Written around 2001 and published by a company that went under immediately after on printing. Prior to the Ghostbusters videogame (which was written by Aykroyd and Ramis to be an official third "movie") this book was considered to be the official third chapter in the Ghostbusters mythos. Unfortunately, due to the company going under there were insanely few copies printed, and for that reason I've never been able to find one, and when I do it's for some ungodly amount ($150-200 for a paperback) which I refuse to pay. Anyway, so far it's pretty good. One weird thing though is when I first started reading the voices I heard in my head were Winston and Louis' movie counterparts, but for some odd reason for Ray, Pete and Egon I heard their Real Ghostbusters cartoon voices. I've managed to start hearing their movie voices though, so it's all okay now. One thing I will say about the book. The writer definitely captured the feel of the movies, and every character is written perfectly. Their dialogue is so spot on to the characters that it almost doesn't feel like you're reading it but more like you're hearing them say it themselves.

----------------------------

Up to #48 of Amazing Spider-Man. Passed the end of the Ditko run and on to the Romita, Sr. stuff. Bigger panels equals less panels equals less exposition equals less annoying things being said. Still plenty of annoying things being said though. Seriously, how many times do I need to know word for word from several different people that Kraven can "Stop a charging bull elephant with his bare hands"?

----------------------------

This month's Ultimate Universe titles (Ultimate Spider-Man #158 and Ultimate Avengers vs. New Ultimates #4). The Earth-1610 books have been in a slump since the big Ultimatum event, and seemed to lack any real direction, but Marvel seems to be tightening things up. The Death of Spider-Man event is moving along pretty well without being boring. It's basically an event crossing over those two books. Essentially, Carol Danvers took over as lead S.H.I.E.L.D. operator and commanded the Ultimates (currently consisting of Captain America, Thor, Iron Man, Black Widow and Giant Man) after Nick Fury did some interdimensional no-nos and was imprisoned in another dimension. Nick had to be brought back to help stop Magneto during Ultimatum. Afterwords, he started working for S.H.I.E.L.D. again, and ran a black ops team called the Avengers (consisting of Hawk Eye, War Machine, Tyrone Cash AKA Black Hulk, Blade, Tony Stark's older brother Gregory ((Think Tony, but 10x more obnoxious and arrogant)) and Punisher).

Well, obviously there's tension between Carol and Nick, because Nick wants his old job back. Then Danvers gets intel that Nick has been selling Super Soldier data to foreign countries for the last fifteen years, so the Ultimates are ordered to take down Nick and the Avengers. On the flipside Nick gets intel that Carol is doing shady business, so a huge fight ensues. Fight ends up on a bridge, Punisher is about to take out Cap from a sniper position and Spidey wings in out of nowhere on the last panel to take the bullet for Cap.

That brings us up to this month's issues. In UAvNU everyone on the bridge is freaking out over Spidey being shot. Punisher says he needs to be punished for shooting Spidey. Cap calls paramedics, and tells Pete he'll be alright when the fighting starts up again when War Machine and Thor crash into the bridge while fighting. Pete gets left behind.

Hop to Spidey #158, Pete wakes up and wonders why he's been shot, and no one bothered to help him. He webs up his wound and is about to go to the hospital when he sees Norman Osborne and his Sinister Six (Norman, Kraven, Electro, Vulture and Sandman. Yeah that's only five. I'll explain.) flying through the air. They've recently escaped incarceration and are looking to even things up with Spidey. Doc Ock was with them until he expressed his distaste for Norman's bloodlust towards Spidey. Doc Ock was originally just as anti-Spidey as Osborne, but due to recent events had a change of heart. Anyway, Norman kills Ock. Just straight out smashes and burns his head.

So the Sinister "Six" are headed to Pete's home. Well, again, due to recent circumstances, both the FF and X-Men have disbanded, and Bobby Drake and Johnny Storm (Ice Man and Human Torch) are living with Pete posing as his cousins. Osborne and his friends show up, asking about Pete and everyone gets into a fist fight and right as the good guys are losing Pete swings in to save the day still being all hardcore super-hero with his webbed up bullet wound in his gut.

Jump back to UAvNU. After all the crazy rubbish someone needs to be appointed head of S.H.I.E.L.D. until all the double-agent hubub gets sorted, so the president asks Greg Stark (who didn't take part in all the fighting nonsense) to do the honours. So Greg commandeers a heli-carrier as his main base and brings Nick Fury to the bow to have a little convo. Greg tells Nick how he was actually the one selling Super Soldier data to the revolutionary groups in other countries where, in return, they had promised to set up democratic governments once the current ones had been overthrown. Nick tells him that that's an interesting plan, but that he's quite the planner himself (and due to Earth-1610's Nick Fury being one hell of a master-strategist that always having some plan in motion in the background and several tricks up his sleeve we never expect to see him be immediately executed point blank by machine-gun fire. Which is exactly what happens).
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Postby Alice » Sat May 21, 2011 12:27 am

Oh, sidenote. If any of you schmoes are in a bookstore (new or used) could you keep an eye out for these two books? Both are pretty damn rare, and at this point I don't even care what condition I can get them in. I just want them in my collection.

Ghostbusters: The Return by Sholly Fisch

It was also called Ghostbusters: Urban Legends at one point, so you might want to keep an eye out for that too.

Image

Ghostbusters: The Supernatural Spectacular by Richard Mueller

There were two movie novelizations, but this one had a lot of background info and deleted scenes and stuff that didn't make it into the movie, so it's kinda like a "Director's Cut" novelization.

Image
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Postby Ghost » Sat May 21, 2011 9:36 am

I'll keep an eye out. Also, BLACK HULK????
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Postby Alice » Sat May 21, 2011 11:30 am

Yeah. The whole Ultimate Universe revolves around super soldiers. Sorta like nukes and the arms race in real life. Way back in WWI the government started up the Super Soldier Program. Nick Fury was looting (as blacks do) instead of fighting the war like he was supposed to, so he got the choice of either court marshal or partake in the experiment. He became the world's first Super Soldier, but escaped and went into hiding.

In WWII they injected Steve Rodgers, and he stuck around long enough to get lost in the arctic in a block of ice. Meanwhile, the doctor who invented the formula was killed, and the formula was all in his head, so ever since the government has been going to great lengths to replicate the serum. Even going as far as to pay private contractors to come up with something.

This has led to such things as Banner becoming the Hulk when he tested his serum on himself, Norman Osborne becoming the Green Goblin as well as he creation of Spidey, Doc Ock etc. etc. One such example is Leonard Williams. A feeble old black scientist working with Banner that was getting around on two canes. He was working with Banner on the Hulk serum, and vanished years ago with the majority of Banner's work, and the original Hulk serum. He turned up later when the Avengers went recruiting living in South America under the name Tyrone Cash. He was then recruited into the Avengers black ops team, and since he's a black guy that Hulks out they just started calling him Black Hulk. And not always in a nice way.

Also, the mutants... they're not the next step in human evolution. They're a side effect to the whole super soldier arms race. A screw up that kinda went viral.
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Postby Ghost » Sat May 21, 2011 11:47 am

Should have called him Big Black.
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Postby Alice » Sat May 21, 2011 11:56 am

John Coffey.
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Postby Ghost » Sat May 21, 2011 12:05 pm

Buck or Pulpwood Hulk would also suffice.
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Postby Alice » Sat May 21, 2011 12:17 pm

Porch Hulk.
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Postby Ghost » Sat May 21, 2011 12:18 pm

The Incredible Yard Ape?
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Postby Alice » Sat May 21, 2011 12:30 pm

Gammawog.
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Postby Ghost » Sun Jul 17, 2011 6:53 pm

Outer Dark by Cormac McCarthy - BLEAK
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Postby Alice » Mon Jul 18, 2011 2:03 am

Finished my Simpson's book. It's basically a bunch of interviews and personal stories and stuff stitched together by a narrator to form a kind of oral history type thing. Very interesting read if you want to learn about things going on behind the curtain. I'd recommend it, but the narrator kinda seems like a biased fanboy at times. If you can ignore a good deal of his biased shite talk it's a good book. Also, he gets a few things wrong. He accused Australia of manufacturing bootleg Duff beer when Simpsons was in it's prime and everyone was bootlegging memorabilia left and right. While there was a case of Fox threatening legal action against an Australian brewery for making Duff that product had actually been manufactured before the show even started, but Fox claimed they had the copyright.

There's also a very interesting chapter devoted to Conan's tenure, and talks about things like skulking around the lot at night in his Ford Taurus, creating a game where you take apart a portable pool cue, spin the pieces as many times as you can and reassemble it within a minute and giving a janitor a heart attack.

----------------------------

Up to Amazing Spider-Man #62. The series is finally hitting it's stride, and aside from a relapse every now and then it's broken out of its episodic sitcom, cooky-cutter plot with a new villain phase.
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Re: Last Book You Read/How Was It

Postby Alice » Fri Jul 27, 2012 4:04 am

50 Shades of Grey.
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Re: Last Book You Read/How Was It

Postby Ghost » Fri Jul 27, 2012 12:59 pm

WHYLIGHT???? :neverforget:
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Re: Last Book You Read/How Was It

Postby exolstice » Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:47 pm

I'm starting the third book in the Hunger Games trilogy. The main character is a bit naive/dumb, but that might just be an age thing (17). Enjoyable, but it's no Harry Potter.
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Re: Last Book You Read/How Was It

Postby Alice » Fri Jul 27, 2012 4:10 pm

Ghost wrote:WHYLIGHT???? :neverforget:


Fuck you for believing me.
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Re: Last Book You Read/How Was It

Postby Ghost » Fri Jul 27, 2012 4:45 pm

Fuck you for making me doubt you!
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Re: Last Book You Read/How Was It

Postby Alice » Wed Oct 17, 2012 9:40 am

11/22/63: Favourite King book now. I didn't want the story to end. It could have gone on for another 1000 pages and I would have kept reading with joy.
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Re: Last Book You Read/How Was It

Postby Alice » Wed Dec 17, 2014 4:49 am

Total Recall (Arnold S.'s autobiography): Great read. I thought I'd end up getting bored during the later, political, parts of the book, but it kept me engaged. There are some great little stories about his time in the Austrian army before setting out for the US, as well as some shenaningans he and Franco Columbu got up to once he got there.

Gone Girl: This may be my favourite book/movie, movie/book set. The movie was just as good as the book, and the book was like a director's cut. Interesting to see the changes that were made, given that Gillian Flynn adapted the book for the screen herself.

Alien 3 novelisation: Some interesting added scenes/alternate dialogue given that this was adapted from one of the earlier, unfinalized shooting drafts of the script (Alien 3 had about nine drafts before having a conclusive script, and even that script was changed constantly during shooting resulting in Fincher disowning the film.) Foster, the writer of the novelization disagreed with killing Newt and Hicks and asked Fox to let him write the story with both surviving. When they refused, he said he wouldn't write anymore novelizations of the Alien films. Lucky for him, because every Alien related movie after that was shite anyway.

Alien: Out of the Shadows: I haven't finished this one. Can't muster the interest. Essentially, Fox decided to have a trilogy of novels written that takes place between Alien and Aliens that would be taken into official continuity. The plot revolves around a group of space truckers that have been sent to Acheron (the new official name for the planet LV-426 from the first two movies) for mining. Several are killed planetside and on one of the dropships returning to the mothership. I stopped reading it, because the characters that survive are almost literally carbon copies of the cast from Alien. Even the lead guy becomes a love interest for Ripley.

WAIT! RIPLEY!

Yeah. Apparently, the 57 years she spent floating in space between the first and second movie wasn't spent in the confines of her busted hypersleep chamber. The book takes place 37 years after the first movie. The crew of the mothership that's the setting of this book intercepts the Narcissus, and wakes Ripley up. I read a bit after this, but then grew tired of it and skipped to the end. The lead guy ends up putting Ripley back into hypersleep and launching her back out into space to float for another 20 years.

And yet, when Burke tells her in Aliens that she's been floating out there for 57 years she seems totally surprised. And when she's being debriefed in Aliens, she makes no mention of any of the events in this book even though it would have helped the credibility of her story. Yeah. Hard to stay interested in a book that's supposed to be taken into the official continuity when it outright doesn't gel with the established continuity. Retconning events is one thing, but just outright contradicting the movies just seems dumb.

The book isn't particularly well written either, and Ripley's characterization therein doesn't match her onscreen persona.

Stephen King's Revival: Another great King story about religion. Ends up being a Cthulhu Mythos related story. You'd think that's a spoiler, but you'd have to be blind not to expect it since A) It's not the first time one of his stories has had Mythos ties, and B) There's a Lovecraft quote at the beginning of the book.

Doctor Sleep and Mr. Mercedes were also good.

Darth Maul: Lockdown: Maul infiltrates a prison as an inmate to retrieve a superweapon for Palpatine. However, the prison's warden runs an illegal gambling racket wherein she uses the inmates as gladiators. Even if you don't care about the mythos of Star Wars (Which I don't anymore. I just retain some interest in certain characters.) the book is still an interesting, stand-alone story.

IDW's Ghostbusters Volume 1 and 2: Saw Ghostbusters in the cinema on Halloween night, and it reignited my passion for one of my oldest loves, Ghostbusters. Read the IDW comics, and they're really good. They follow the continuity established by Harold and Dan (Ghostbusters, Ghostbusters II and Ghostbusters the Videogame being official continuity) and build on that. There's also a veritable shite ton of easter eggs for hardcore fans. There's a bit where the gang meets future versions of themselves, and they're all wearing the clothes that their respective series 2 Real Ghostbusters figures from the 80s were wearing. Also, future Egon is a bit on the chubby side due to his junk food addiction, and, what I'm assuming is an allusion to Ramis' real life weight gain later in life. Volume 2 ended several months ago, and while binge reading the lot I'm really interested in getting a Volume 3 at some point. Also, I wish they would just let that Ghostbusters 3 movie they keep talking about just die.

Also, I've finally gotten around to reading that book about the history of ghosts and mediums that Dan's dad wrote, and, like I suspected, It's pretty damning of the whole scene, even though the whole Aykroyd family has an affinity for it. I'm about a quarter through and most of it has been him calling bullshit on tons of stuff. It's all written very objectively.

Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters: Five novellas. One for each of the bounty hunters that Vader hired to track down Solo in TESB. Each story is background/origin for the characters, as well as what they were doing before, during and after TESB. The IG-88 story was great, the Dengar one made me like him where I had absolutely no interest before but the Boba Fett story made me want to kill myself. Not because of the narrative, but because the writer was such a pretentious dickhead that it literally made it hard to read. I had to stop and read sentences and sometimes whole paragraphs over and over, because the guy wanted to write shite all poetically where just saying something succinctly would have made the story flow much better.
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Re: Last Book You Read/How Was It

Postby exolstice » Thu Dec 18, 2014 9:26 am

Neuromancer - I had trouble following it, but interesting read nonetheless as it is a pretty clear precursor to things like The Matrix.
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